Bölge Ara

Vacation in Kars TURKEY

 

The population of 73,826 (in 2010), it is the largest city on the Turkish side of the border with Armenia. For a brief period of time, it served as the capital of the medieval Bagratid Kingdom of Armenia. Its significance increased in the 19th century, when Kars was contested between the Ottoman and Russian empires, with the latter gaining control of the city as a result of the 1877-78 war. During World War I, the Ottomans took control of the city in 1918, but were forced to relinquish it to the First Republic of Armenia following the Armistice of Mudros. During the Turkish–Armenian War in late 1920, Turkish revolutionaries captured Kars for the last time. The controversial[.Treaty of Kars was signed in 1921 between the Government of the Grand National Assembly and the Soviet republics of Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia, which established the current north-eastern boundaries of Turkey. Little is known of the early history of Kars beyond the fact that it had its own dynasty of Armenian rulers and was the capital of a region known as Vanand. As Chorzene, the town appears in Roman historiography (Strabo) as part of ancient Armenia.[10] Medieval Armenian historians referred to the city by a variety of names, including "Karuts' K'aghak'" (Kars city), "Karuts' Berd", "Amrots'n Karuts'" (both meaning Kars Fortress) and "Amurn Karuts'" (Impenetrable Kars). At some point in the ninth century (at least by 888) it became part of the territory of the Armenian Bagratunis. Kars was the capital of Bagratid Kingdom of Armenia between 928 and 961. During this period the town's cathedral, later known as the Church of the Holy Apostles, was built. In 963, shortly after the Bagratuni seat was transferred to Ani, Kars became the capital of a separate independent kingdom, again called Vanand. The extent of its actual independence from the Kingdom of Ani is uncertain: it was always in the possession of the relatives of the rulers of Ani, and, after Ani's capture by the Byzantine Empire in 1045, the Bagratuni title "King of Kings" held by the ruler of Ani was transferred to the ruler of Kars. In 1064, just after the capture of Ani by Alp Arslan (King of the Seljuk Turks), the Armenian king of Kars, Gagik-Abas, paid homage to the victorious Turks, so that they would not lay siege to his city. In 1065 Gagik-Abas ceded control of Kars to the Byzantine Empire, but soon after Kars was taken by the Seljuk Turks. In 1206/07 the city was captured by the Georgians and given to the same Zakarid family who ruled Ani. They retained control of Kars until the late 1230s, after which it had Turkish rulers. In 1387 the city surrendered to Timur (Tamerlane) and its fortifications were damaged. Anatolian beyliks followed until 1534, when the Ottoman army captured the city. The fortifications of the city were rebuilt by the Ottoman Sultan Murad III and were strong enough to withstand a siege by Nadir Shah of Persia, in 1731. It became the head of a sanjak in the Ottoman Erzurum Vilayet. There are seen Plataue climate in Kars and the coldest area of East side Anatolia. There long and hard winters, lepid and cold summers in Kars. Climate of this area so cold and long. The economy of province is agriculture and animal husbandry. There are cultivate barley, wheat, rye, vetch, corn, onions, potatoes, sugar beet in Kars. There are product vegetabla and fruit in plains.Apricots, watermelon, apple, melon, plum and pear cultivate there. There are cultivate a few walnuts, grapes, cucumber, tomato and cabbage. And for animal husbandry livestock . Hair, wool and wool felt-rugs, saddle-weaving is done. Beekeeping in the foreground. Due to the development of the priority provinces in Kars, Kars Combine meat fish Agency and Dairy Industry Authority, Kars SEK Mama Products Property, a feed and cement factories. Small industries are also quite common. Although not a province rich in underground resources, rock salt in Kagizman local, asbestos, magnesite; In Sarikamish local perlite, salt deposits and mineral water springs are.

 

 

Yandex.Metrica